Life of a dairy cow at the Fairchild Dairy Teaching & Research Center

 

Full Blown Cow
(A CURIOUS COW LIKES THE CAMERA) The Fairchild Dairy Teaching & Research center is home to approximately 200 heifers (young female cows). Each day 70-80 cows are milked twice a day yielding about 800 gallons of milk each day.
Calf
(A CALF RESTING IN THE NURSERY) Every milk producing heifer has to give birth to a calf each year before they can begin producing milk. After the calf is born it is separated from its mother and brought to the nursery. The calf must receive colostrum from their mother within 24 hours for their immune systems to fully develop. Their diet consists of milk or a formula. Calfs can drink up to 10% of their body weight in milk each day. After 2 months they are then transferred to the free stall barn.
Hefers
(TWO YOUNG HEIFERS POSE FOR A PICTURE) The heifers in the free stall barn range in age from 2-18 months. The young heifers (2-3 months) are switched from their milk diet to an enriched corn diet that offers them the essential nutrients and carbohydrates they need to grow. The older cows in the barn (13-18 months) have grown to reach about 1,000 pounds, and within the next 9 months will have their first calfs.
After the birth of their first calf the heifers are finally considered cows. Twice daily they will be brought to the milking parlor where they will be attached to the milking machine. Once the cow begins producing milk it needs to be milked twice daily at relatively the same time to ensure the comfort and health of the cow. If this does not happen the cow will stop producing milk after several uncomfortable days.
(THE MILKING MACHINE) After the birth of their first calf the heifers are finally considered cows. Twice daily they will be brought to the milking parlor where they will be attached to the milking machine. Once the cow begins producing milk it needs to be milked twice daily at relatively the same time to ensure the comfort and health of the cow. If this does not happen the cow will stop producing milk after several uncomfortable days.
(A PRODUCTION COW ADJUSTS TO HER FIRST FEW DAYS IN THE DRY BARN) After about a year of production the the cows are transitioned to the pack or dry barn where they will not be milked. Her the cows are given a shot to help them be more comfortable as they adjust to not being in production anymore. The cows are able to rest on 12-inches of packed saw dust where they can rest unit the 8th or 9th month of their next pregnancy.
(A PRODUCTION COW ADJUSTS TO HER FIRST FEW DAYS IN THE DRY BARN) After about a year of production the the cows are transitioned to the pack or dry barn where they will not be milked. Here the cows are given a shot to help them be more comfortable as they adjust to not being in production anymore. The cows are able to rest on 12-inches of packed saw dust where they can rest unit the 8th or 9th month of their next pregnancy. When they will be put back into the milking cycle.

 

 

FullSizeRender“I started looking for a job back in 2003 when a lot of places were closing down or laying people off, so I applied to the universities and hospitals because they’re not going anywhere anytime soon. So I got the job here and have been working my way up ever since. I am fully benefitted now and everyday I come here to work as hard as I can and try to better myself.”

A morning in UNH’s Tirrell Horse Barn

Horse
Marquosa

 

Marqoesa wakes up to the hum of a John Deere tractor pulling through the doors of her stable. As she awakes she is presented with three flakes of Carb-Guard feed and a wheelbarrow is parked next to her to carry away the mess from the night.

“Every morning people are here cleaning the stalls.” Said Jess Childs, a UNH students working at the Tirrell Horse Barn.

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Jess Childs Cleaning the stalls

 

As part of the morning routine the horses are cycled from inside to outside and stall to stall as they eat, exercise, get brushed, and have their stable cleaned.

“Each horse is outside for at least two hours every day,” said Child “Although if the weather is nice they tend to spend even more time than that.”

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UNH equipment room

Within the 40 stalls of the Tirrell Horse Barn there are 28 UNH owned horses and several other student horses owned by UNH or Thomson School students. The UNH horses are used for horse lessons, classes, and students who love to ride do not have their own horse on campus.

Paige Templeton, taking ANSC 402: Horsemanship, was gearing up to ride.

“I am here every Tuesday and Thursday for my class,” said Templeton “I go out and ride into the riding pens and practice dressage and jumping.”

Templeton said she has ridden before, but was never able to own her own horse. She likes the UNH program because it allows her continue learning to ride, but significantly cuts down the costs.

 

A new face for UNH Wi-Fi

For those who have not yet adjusted to the new UNH Wi-Fi networks, you may consider switching over the UNH-Public or UNH-Secure network sooner than later. According to Dan Corbeil, the UNH Telecommunications Operations Manager, wireless clients will no longer have access to the “unh-highspeed” or “unhwireless” networks after October 7th. In addition to this change, residential halls will also see a new network called UNH-gaming. A network designed specifically for students online gaming systems.

“The reason for changing the network names was to more accurately depict the purpose of each network,” said Corbeil “ The function and speed of the networks remain the same. Students should choose UNH-Secure whenever possible, UNH-Public is unsecure and information sent using this network could be intercepted. The function and speed of the networks remain the same.”

According to speedtest.net, a website designed to test the speed and functionality of internet connections, the networks UNH-Secure, UNH-Public, and unh-highspeed, all have similar speeds. The tests took place in Handler Hall, Horton Hall, and the Memorial Union Building. The site graded the both network connections as a “B”, meaning the networks are very good, but some online games may not perform optimally.

However, UNH-Gaming will not provide students with a faster connection. According to Corbeil, this network was created for the gaming stations that cannot authenticate and connect to the UNH-Secure network.

A problem that many students have had including Chis Hastings, a sophomore at UNH living in Handler Hall.

“It just shows an error code every time I try to connect it,” said Hastings “After a while I just gave up trying.”

Hastings did admit he had similar troubles last year connecting to the unh-highspeed, but it just magically worked one day. He now awaits to the UNH-Gaming network to finally update his XBOX-360 and try out his new copy of NHL 15 online.

Yet, some students like David Desaulniers, a junior finance major, still prefer the older unh-highspeed network. He claims that the connection feels much slower and that it takes forever to verify his computer on the network.

Corbeil says that most performance issues students face can be linked to radio frequency interference primarily from unauthorized wireless devices, most commonly wireless routers and personal hotspots.

“These devices disrupt the service for the universities wireless access points,” said Corbeil “For the university wireless network to work properly ad-hoc wireless networks should be disabled.”

For those who still seem less than optimistic about the new network changes Corbeil offers four tips to help smooth the transition:

  1. Open your wireless settings, if you see available networks other than UNH-Public or UNH-Secure someone near you has a wireless device that is causing RF interference. Work with your neighbors and RA’s to get these wireless devices turned off.
  2. If you have a wireless printer the university recommends using a USB cable to print and disabling the Wireless Direct function. The Wireless Direct function broadcast its own SSID and creates RF inference and could prevent you and your neighbors from connecting to the campus wireless network.
  3. Cell phone hotspots, Mifi, Jetpacks and other personal hotspots are another area of RF interference and should not be used when in areas serviced by the university wireless network
  4. If users take these steps and continue to experience problems we ask that they please contact UNH IT at 862-4242 with detailed information include the location they experience the problem and the time-of-day. We are committed to making the wireless network better but we need everyone’s help.